Gustavus Students to Present Research at State Capitol

Posted on February 15th, 2013 by

Minnesota State CapitolTwo Gustavus Adolphus College students will be among the 37 undergraduate students who will present their research at the 2013 Minnesota Private College Scholars at the Capitol event from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19.

Senior Anna Morton ’13 will present her research on “Course-Based Civic Engagement: Understanding Student Perspectives and Outcomes,” that she conducted under the advisement of Professor of Communication Studies Leila Brammer. In her abstract, Morton writes that “although a number of interesting findings, including insights about student learning, personal growth, and empowerment are embedded in the reflections, this presentation focuses on how students described civic engagement, but their experiences and general conclusions about the nature of productive community involvement. Students identified five factors – research, collaboration, effort, passion, and responsibility – as useful and imperative for civic engagement.”

Anna Morton at the Symposium on Teaching and Learning in Banff, Canada, where she and Dr. Leila Brammer presented their research in November 2012.

Anna Morton ’13 at the Symposium on Teaching and Learning in Banff, Canada, where she and Dr. Leila Brammer presented their research in November 2012.

“I’m honored to participate in Scholars at the Capitol,” Morton said. “I’m passionate about this research, so I’m excited to present it at the Capitol. I am also looking forward to learning about other undergraduate students’ research and collaboration opportunities.”

Senior Tara Selly ’13 will present her research on “Identifying Precambrian Microfossils Through Decay Patterns in Modern Algae and Cyanobacteria,” that she conducted under the advisement of Associate Professor of Geology Julie Bartley. In her abstract, Selly writes “In this study, we explored whether characteristics related to post-mortem changes as microbes become fossils could help resolve identification difficulties. This project made a direct comparison between photosynthetic bacteria and eukaryotic algae and established a framework by which other groups (e.g., fungi, animals) can be evaluated. Based on these initial findings, these decay characteristics may be useful when combined with traditional taxonomy, in identifying ancient microfossils.”

The Minnesota Private College Scholars at the Capitol event not only celebrates student scholarship and the efforts of their faculty advisors, but it is also a chance for state legislators and other visitors to the Capitol to witness the breadth and depth of undergraduate research that takes place at the state’s private schools.

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Media Contact: Director of Media Relations and Internal Communication Matt Thomas
mthomas@gustavus.edu
507-933-7510

 

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